Halton Images
Fire Engine at King's Castle


Description
Media Type:
Image
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:
King's Castle was the house built by William MacKenzie King, circa 1854. King was the son of Lieutenant George King and Barbara (Chisholm) King. King was raised by his uncle, Oakville founder William Chisholm. King sailed the world, struck gold, and returned home to marry and build his castle, which he was forced to sell a year later. He briefly published a reform newspaper, The Oakville Advertiser.

The house is a distinctively styled brick Gothic Revival House, with tall narrow gables, steeply pitched roof, pointed windows and decorative bargeboards and pendents. In 1858 there was a verandah around the building added by it's fourth owner, the Merry family. The book, God Is In The Attic by H. Merry, describes the Merry family life in this house.

The property has been used as a pony farm and a factory, but was revived to its original Gothic Villa style by Lawrence Weeks and his wife in the 1970s.

It is a heritage building, designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act Register. It is located at 21 Regency Court, Sixth Line, Oakville.
Notes:
Records seem to indicate that William McKenzie King spelled "McKenzie" as such. Fewer have the name as "MacKenzie" and it could also have been "Mackenzie".

Here is information taken from the Upper Canada Militia Records about William McKenzie King's father:
George was the son of Charles King of Fort Erie who settled in Aldershot in 1793 (HB). George married Barbara Chisholm, daughter of George Chisholm and Barbara McKenzie (Chi)(L). George fought in the Battle of Queenston Heights in 1812 (BU). Enlisted May 9, 1811 (O). Took oath Apr. 4, 1812 (O). On June 4, 1812, selected as a lieutenant in the first flank company (D95)(D113). Served Sept. 25 to Oct. 24, 1812 (D226). Served Oct. 25 to Nov. 24, 1812 (D81, D249). Served Nov. 25 to Dec. 10, 1812 (D83, D233). In December of 1812 George died of an illness contracted at Fort Erie and left a widow, Barbara (Chi)(OTW)(S).

In the 1902 book "The Garden of Canada ; Burlington, Oakville and District" by Martha Craig, page 94/100 with photographs and a description of the house for sale by Robert McCausland, the house name is rendered as "Kingscastle".
Date of Original:
July 20, 1949
Subject(s):
Personal Name(s):
William MacKenzie King, b. August 2, 1818 d. July 6, 1859. His wife was Elizabeth Linn. George King, b. 1790 d. 1812. Barbara (Chisholm) King, b. 1757 d. 1824.
Local identifier:
TTOIGEL0005
Collection:
Trafalgar Township Historical Society
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.455535769133 Longitude: -79.6977424621582
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation:
Fire Engine at King's Castle
Contact
Trafalgar Township Historical Society
Email
WWW address

Trafalgar Township Historical Society Sponsor: Jeff Knoll, Local & Regional Councillor for Oakville Ward 5 – Town of Oakville/Regional Municipality of Halton
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Fire Engine at King's Castle


King's Castle was the house built by William MacKenzie King, circa 1854. King was the son of Lieutenant George King and Barbara (Chisholm) King. King was raised by his uncle, Oakville founder William Chisholm. King sailed the world, struck gold, and returned home to marry and build his castle, which he was forced to sell a year later. He briefly published a reform newspaper, The Oakville Advertiser.

The house is a distinctively styled brick Gothic Revival House, with tall narrow gables, steeply pitched roof, pointed windows and decorative bargeboards and pendents. In 1858 there was a verandah around the building added by it's fourth owner, the Merry family. The book, God Is In The Attic by H. Merry, describes the Merry family life in this house.

The property has been used as a pony farm and a factory, but was revived to its original Gothic Villa style by Lawrence Weeks and his wife in the 1970s.

It is a heritage building, designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act Register. It is located at 21 Regency Court, Sixth Line, Oakville.