The Iron Bridge, c. 1900
Description
Media Type
Image
Item Type
Photographs
Description
Norval on the Credit The Iron Bridge.
Text on the back reads: "The old Iron Bridge. Before the elms died, that was a particularly pretty stretch of the'town line' with the elms arching to meet over head and an unusual and attractive vine at the nearend of the bridge. The Credit River was wider and deeper in those days and showed no indication of what it would become, a tired stream, struggling to maintain some respectability as a river of renown.
About 175 years ago, the old Credit transported thousands of white oak barrel staves cut in the valley and floated down stream to Port Credit to be shipped to the Caribbean for rum barrels - you can still find the odd stave by the river. Just to the left over the bridge there was a marvellous very old wild apple tree, we called it the Drill shed apple. Why it wasn't recognizedas an apple treasure I'll never know - scions could have been taken from it and grafted on younger trees. The flavour was superb, it was juicy, the aroma was something to remember and it had red streaks and a bit of a blush, and sometimes was too big to go in a pocket, a draw back we could certainly live with. I wouldn't trade one of those wild apples for a dozen with a pedigree.
Pictures from the Maxwell files
script by M. Maxwell, R 4 Georgetown, OntarioL7G 4S7"
Physical details: 16 cm X 23 cm, folded card, printed in grey ink.
Date of Original
1994
Date Of Event
c.1900
Dimensions
16 cm X 23 cm
Subject(s)
Local identifier
p10196f.jpg
Collection
Esquesing Historical Society
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.65011 Longitude: -79.84963
Copyright Statement
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Esquesing Historical Society
Email:esquesinghs@gmail.com
Website:
Agency street/mail address:

P.O. Box 51,

Georgetown, ON L7G 4T1

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The Iron Bridge, c. 1900


Norval on the Credit The Iron Bridge.
Text on the back reads: "The old Iron Bridge. Before the elms died, that was a particularly pretty stretch of the'town line' with the elms arching to meet over head and an unusual and attractive vine at the nearend of the bridge. The Credit River was wider and deeper in those days and showed no indication of what it would become, a tired stream, struggling to maintain some respectability as a river of renown.
About 175 years ago, the old Credit transported thousands of white oak barrel staves cut in the valley and floated down stream to Port Credit to be shipped to the Caribbean for rum barrels - you can still find the odd stave by the river. Just to the left over the bridge there was a marvellous very old wild apple tree, we called it the Drill shed apple. Why it wasn't recognizedas an apple treasure I'll never know - scions could have been taken from it and grafted on younger trees. The flavour was superb, it was juicy, the aroma was something to remember and it had red streaks and a bit of a blush, and sometimes was too big to go in a pocket, a draw back we could certainly live with. I wouldn't trade one of those wild apples for a dozen with a pedigree.
Pictures from the Maxwell files
script by M. Maxwell, R 4 Georgetown, OntarioL7G 4S7"
Physical details: 16 cm X 23 cm, folded card, printed in grey ink.