North Trafalgar Community Club, 1961
Description
Media Type
Image
Item Type
Photographs
Description
North Trafalgar Community Club 40th Anniversary at Hoy's Chinese Restaurant, Streetsville.

In 1921 a family newly arrived in north Trafalgar Township was in desperate need of help. A small group of women got together to provide the family with clothing and food donations. Their efforts were greatly appreciated and on September 15, 1921, they met to form a club to continue providing aid to the community. The motto was, "A rose to the living is worth many flowers to the dead", or, "Flowers for the living". At the January 1922 meeting, they christened their group, "The North Trafalgar Community Club" and Mr. Doug McGregor, better known as Sandy, presented them with a song which opened every meeting thereafter.

Deliberately run without red tape or the support of a larger organization, club members helped victims of fires, paid to help with hospitalization and/or nursing care, visited people ill or shut-in at home, provided donations to local charities, and during war-time packed ditty-bags. The active women invited speakers to keep informed and raised money with euchre and dance parties.
Notes
Words to the Club's "Ode":
God be with us at this meeting,
May we do what good we can.
May we feel His presence with us
Every time we form a plan.

When our journey here is ended
And we lay aside our task,
If we've helped someone in trouble
That is all the joy we ask.

Let us now all ask God's blessing,
Fill our hears with peace and love,
Then we will not feel like strangers,
When we join the "Club" above.
Date of Publication
1961
Date Of Event
1961
Subject(s)
Personal Name(s)
Front row left to right: Mary Leslie, Maybelle May, ?, Joan Williamson, Mrs. Sandford, Kathleen May. Second row left to right: Will Leslie, Irene McCracken, Emily Beattie, Beth May, ?, Bessie Marshall, Viva Hamilton. Third row left to right: Mary Watson, Vera Williamson, ?, Clara May, Dora McCarron, Alfred McCracken, ?, ?, Ottilie Dowling, Dorreen Ball, Marjory Sparling. Fourth row left to right: Ellison Ball, Gordon Leslie, Merle Leslie, June Leslie, ?, ?, Hasel Dalgleish, Alex Watson, Alfred Ball, Morice Williamson. Fifth row left to right: ?, ?, ?, Jim May, Cliff May, Norman Sparling. Back row left to right: ?, Mrs. Cordingly, Edna Ball, ?, Marda Miller.
Local identifier
TTRMW000337
Collection
Trafalgar Township Historical Society
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.48341 Longitude: -79.71632
Copyright Statement
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation
North Trafalgar Community Club, 1961
Contact
Trafalgar Township Historical Society
Email:michelle@tths.ca
Website:

Trafalgar Township Historical Society Sponsor: Jeff Knoll, Local & Regional Councillor for Oakville Ward 5 – Town of Oakville/Regional Municipality of Halton
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North Trafalgar Community Club, 1961


North Trafalgar Community Club 40th Anniversary at Hoy's Chinese Restaurant, Streetsville.

In 1921 a family newly arrived in north Trafalgar Township was in desperate need of help. A small group of women got together to provide the family with clothing and food donations. Their efforts were greatly appreciated and on September 15, 1921, they met to form a club to continue providing aid to the community. The motto was, "A rose to the living is worth many flowers to the dead", or, "Flowers for the living". At the January 1922 meeting, they christened their group, "The North Trafalgar Community Club" and Mr. Doug McGregor, better known as Sandy, presented them with a song which opened every meeting thereafter.

Deliberately run without red tape or the support of a larger organization, club members helped victims of fires, paid to help with hospitalization and/or nursing care, visited people ill or shut-in at home, provided donations to local charities, and during war-time packed ditty-bags. The active women invited speakers to keep informed and raised money with euchre and dance parties.